Special Feature
Train Horns

Note: We have no horns for sale and all were acquired legally
These horns are available for loan to local shortlines upon request

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Featuring Train Horns in Our Collection
Photo Brief Comments Audio Years Produced Where on NS More Information
Hancock 4700 Air Whistle
Hancock was a major manufacturer of steam whistles. They marketed this air whistle but it was soon discovered that they just aren't loud enough when traveling at speed. Two of Conrail's E8s wore Hancock air whistles in the 70s and 80s. They fell out of use and you're unlikely to find one in use on anything other than a museum piece.
Shop Air Audio
Shop Air Video
RTM M-25
late 50s - late 60s n/a 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Leslie A-75-440-MB
One common use I've found for the Leslie A-75 is on B units for use with their hostler controls. There's a short and long bell version. This is the short bell version and is a fairly high note.
Shop Air Audio n/a 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Leslie A-125-247-PB
This all-bronze A-125 dates to the 1950s. A-125s also came in aluminum. This particular horn comes from one of the Milwaukee Road's Hiawatha Locomotives.
Shop Air Audio 1930s - 1950s n/a 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Leslie A-200-LP
This all-bronze A-200 likely dates to the 1930s. A-200-LP is the pre-1950 designation for the A-200-156. I got this horn, not so much because they were used on the PRR GG1 (this one likely was not), but more for its rich, low pitch sound. This horn weighs 50 lbs. You're not likely to see an A-200 in use today except on a museum piece.
Shop Air Audio
Shop Air Video
RTM M-25
1930s - 1950s n/a 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Leslie RS-3L
For me growing up with Conrail, this horn screams "freight train." Union Pacific and BNSF were also users, but all Leslies have fallen out of favor. This particular horn is from NS 3812 which was scrapped by Cresson Steel and sounds great. The 'RS' power chambers give this horn a distictive squeal when starting to blow.
Shop Air Audio
Shop Air Video
1970s - Present Most unrebuilt former Conrail engines 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Leslie S-5T
Known as the "King of Horns" because of its deep, commanding, and haunting tone, this horn is rare on class ones today and getting replaced with Nathans. Built in 1956, this particular horn has the original style tab-back power chambers that do not produce the squeal that the 'RS' chambers are known for.
Shop Air Audio 1951 - 1970s n/a 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Leslie RS-5T
Known as the "King of Horns" because of its deep, commanding, and haunting tone, this horn is getting rare on class ones today and getting replaced with Nathans. The 'RS' power chambers give this horn a distictive squeal when starting to blow.
Shop Air Audio
Shop Air Video
RTM M-25
1970s - Present A few SD40Es, SD60Es, some former NW engines, and a few Dash9s 5-Chime Consultants
LocomotiveHorns.info
Nathan/AirChime M3R1T
This is rare variation of the M3. It was developed for use on Deleware & Hudson RS3s with the 2 and 4 bells facing forward and the tilted 1 bell facing backward at an angle to clear the cab roof. This horn was supposedly from a New York Central ALCO, but I suspect that's not correct.
Shop Air Audio 1952 - 1980s n/a 5-Chime Consultants
Nathan/AirChime M5
The M5 is probably the most sought-after horns among collectors for its melodic tone. The Southern was a big user of the M5 and the Rockhill Trolley Museum's Mack gas-electric also had one for a time. The M series was replaced by the easier-to-maintain K series and you're unlikely to find them in use on anything but museum equipment. This particular M5 dates to the 70s and was previously on an Amtrak unit.
Shop Air Audio
Shop Air Video
RTM M-25
1951 - 1980s n/a 5-Chime Consultants
Nathan/AirChime K3HA
Union Pacific was a big user of the K3HAs on new power until it was replaced by the K3HL and K5 variants recently. This horn would sound the same as a K3LA, as the 'H' just means it uses the high profile manifold.
Shop Air Audio 1977 - Present Most SD90MACs and some SD70ACUs 5-Chime Consultants
Locomotive Horns
Nathan/AirChime K5LA
I purchased this horn brand new in 2007 and call it my "baby." While it may be a 'new' cast, my opinion is that it sounds great and has a very commanding tone. The set of debris covers is also brand new and was added in 2012.
Shop Air Audio
Shop Air Video
RTM M-25
1975 - Present The most common horn on NS, can be found on almost everything 5-Chime Consultants
Locomotive Horns
Nathan/AirChime K5LLA
A couple years ago I had some recordings of NS SD70M-2 and SD70ACe horns analysed and it was determind there are two slightly different versions of K5LLA running around. One version has bells 1L (single or two piece), 1, 2, 3A, and 4A while the other has bells 1L (single piece), 1, 2, 3A, and 4. I pieced this horn together as the phase 1 version then later decided I preferred the phase 2 version. I have the spare parts to switch it back and forth if desired.
Shop Air Audio
RTM M-25
2004 - Present SD70M-2s and SD70ACes 5-Chime Consultants
Locomotive Horns
Wabco DD-5
My first "train horn," this is the original horn off what was to become the Mt. Union Connecting Railroad's motive power. The DD-5 is a small horn that was common on industrial locomotives, track maintenance equipment, and even trucks.
Shop Air Audio
n/a
Wabco A-2
Another early addition to my horn collection is this Wabco A-2. These were usually used on industrial locomotives and sometimes first generation diesel switchers.
n/a 5-Chime Consultants
Wabco E-2
This horn is believed to be from a New York Central ALCO. The E2 was popular on first generation power like the A-200, but not quite as popular. Also like the A-200, it fell out of use in favor of three and five chime horns. Finding an E2 still in use today on anything other than a museum piece would be rare.
Shop Air Audio
RTM M-25
n/a 5-Chime Consultants


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